Friday, September 23, 2011

Habs: Diaz With Top Even-Strength Risk/Reward Through First Two Games

Numbers through first two games of preseason

Here we will focus on even-strength performance only. This season I will not only break the numbers down by zone. I will also separate events into even-strength, powerplay and short-handed situations.


Gorges with top grade
A player's grade is calculated by dividing the number of positive events a player performs in a game (completed pass, takeaway, etc.) by that player's total events (successful + unsuccessful). It does not take into account ice-time.


Diaz with top Risk/Reward
A player's risk/reward is calculated by dividing the total positive events a player performs by a player's ice-time. We then subtract a players negative-events per-minute of ice time from this number to indicate a player's risk/reward rating.
Simply put; it is the difference between a player's "good plays" and "bad plays" for every minute they are on the ice. The bigger the number, the more "good plays" that player makes than "bad plays".
In an instance like this one where we are focusing on even-strength events, the player's events only while playing at even-strength are divided by that player's ice-time while at even-strength.


Spacek with top offensive-zone risk/reward
Like overall risk/reward, offensive-zone risk/reward is the difference between "good plays" and "bad plays" per minute of ice-time. The only difference is that the events in this category are limited to those plays that take place in the offensive-zone. A high offensive-zone risk/reward rating is obtained by completing offensive-zone passes, winning offensive-zone puck-battles, getting shots on net, etc.


St. Denis with top defensive-zone risk/reward rating
Like overall risk/reward rating, defensive-zone risk/reward is the difference between "good plays" and "bad plays" per minute of ice-time. The difference is that the events in this category are limited to those plays that take place in the defensive-zone. A high defensive-zone risk/reward  rating is obtained by completing defensive-zone passes, winning d-zone puck-battles, blocking shots, blocking passes, etc.


Diaz with top neutral-zone risk/reward rating
Like overall risk/reward rating, neutral-zone risk/reward is the difference between "good plays" and "bad plays" per minute of ice-time. The difference is that the events in this category are limited to those plays that take place in the neutral-zone. A high neutral-zone risk/reward  rating is obtained by completing neutral-zone passes, successfully dumping, or carrying the puck into the offensive-zone, blocking passes, winning puck-battles, etc.

**The number in brackets beside the players grade risk/reward indicates where this number places them in respect to the other Habs defensemen. ie. (1) = indicates top grade or risk reward rating in that category. (2)= second-best grade or risk/reward rating within that category, etc.


#6 Jaroslav Spacek

Spacek made some solid decision in the offensive-zone. He kept the puck in-deep on multiple occasions by winning all of his o-zone puck-battles, and o-zone races to loose pucks (new metric).


Grade: 70 (9)
Risk/Reward: 1.51 (8)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.60 (1)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.75 (11)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.15 (8)


#8 Jeff Woywitka

Woywitka made solid decisions, and was among the leaders in all categories. He completed 83% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts, while managing 1 blocked shot and 1 blocked pass.

Grade: 80 (2)
Risk/Reward: 2.05 (3)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.24 (4)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.15 (5)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.36 (3)


# 24 Alex Henry

Henry showed an impressive stick down-low and along the wall. He won 82% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but completed only 64% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 71 (8)
Risk/Reward: 1.53 (7)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.24 (12)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.45 (3)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.08 (11)


#26 Josh Gorges

Gorges did most of his best work on the penalty-kill, but still had a solid showing in both the neutral and defensive-zones. He won all of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and completed an incredible 93% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 82 (1)
Risk/Reward: 1.17 (10)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.14 (10)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.63 (2)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.41(2)


#40 Nathan Beaulieu

Beaulieu held his own. He sits in the middle of the pack for most categories. He won 86% of his defensive-zone puck-battles and completed 68% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts. He successfully blocked only 50% of pass-attempts. Any pass that goes under a player's stick, or through a player's legs is deemed "blockable". He was also credited twice with missing his coverage in the defensive-zone (new metric).

Grade: 73 (5)
Risk/Reward: 1.62 (6)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.10 (9)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.30 (4)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.36 (3)


#42 Jarred Tinordi

Tinordi won only 50% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and 57% of the defensive-zone races to loose pucks he engaged in. He also completed only 50% of his neutral-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 66 (12)
Risk/Reward: 1.08 (11)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.00 (8)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.91 (8)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.11 (9)


#61 Raphael Diaz

Diaz won 57% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and an impressive 86% of the races to loose puck he engaged in. He also completed 83% of his defensive and 100% of his offensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 73 (5)
Risk/Reward: 2.14 (1)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.18 (5)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.98 (7)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.79 (1)


#62 Frederick St. Denis

Like Diaz, St. Denis used his speed to win 86% of the races he engaged in while pursuing loose pucks. He won only 50% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but completed 83% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 80 (2)
Risk/Reward: 2.11 (2)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.08 (6)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.72 (1)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.08 (11)


#68 Yannick Weber

Weber did his best work while short-handed, and played more powerplay and short-handed minutes than any other defenseman. He showed his solid-stick in the defensive-zone; winning 83% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but was only able to complete 60% of his offensive-zone and 50% of his neutral-zone passes.


Grade: 66 (11)
Risk/Reward: 1.05 (12)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.05 (7)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.84 (9)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.10 (10)


#74 Alexei Yemelin

Yemelin's grade was carried by his work in the offensive-zone, as he made solid decisions when attempting to support the attack in the offensive-zone. He won all 7 of the races he engaged in while skating to loose pucks. He also completed an incredible 91% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts. Like Beaulieu, Yemelin needs to work on his ability to block passing lanes, as he was only able to bock 17% of opponents' passes sent through him.


Grade: 73 (5)
Risk/Reward: 1.72 (5)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.32 (3)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.75 (11)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.16 (7)


#75 Hal Gill

Gill had a tough start to the game, but improved as the game progressed. He won 60% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but his lack of foot speed caused him to loose 60% of the puck-races he engaged in.


Grade: 67 (10)
Risk/Reward: 1.34 (9)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.14 (10)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.13 (6)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.28 (6)


#76 PK. Subban

When playing on the powerplay or short-handed, Subban looked like a man among boys. His numbers at even-strength place him among the leaders in most categories. He won 80%  of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and competed 83% of his defensive-zone passes. He got in the way of 67% of "blockable" passes, while also completing 100% of his offensive-zone pass-attempts.


Grade: 80 (2)
Risk/Reward: 1.78 (4)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.48 (2)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.82 (10)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.34 (5)

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