Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Habs: Even-Strength Puck-Possession Ratios

 Subban, Gorges and Plekanec show their value

Tracking every play during a game allows us to determine each player's positive or negative impact on a team's ability to retain puck-possession. This ratio is calculated by dividing each play with positive outcome by each play with a negative outcome. The result tells us how many positive plays a player makes for each negative play. The higher the number, the better the player's ability to maintain or establish puck-possession.

For example if Spacek completes 3 of 4 passes his ratio is (3 completed passes divided by 1 incomplete pass) or (3/1 = 3). Therefore Spacek's ratio would be 3 plays that either maintain or establish puck-possession for every 1 play that either loses or fails to acquire puck-possession. It would be displayed in the graph as simply 3.

Passes are not the only event used. A list of events tracked are here


Through 13 games I have tracked a total of just under 12,000 (yes 12,000)  EVEN-STRENGTH events.

The data for Chris Campoli is limited due to injury. Among players with substantial events, PK Subban has the top puck-possession ratio. Subban makes 2.48 plays that either maintain or establish puck-possession for every 1 play that loses or fails to acquire puck-possession. Other players with ratios above 2.00 include Scott Gomez, Tomas Plekanec, Josh Gorges, Yannick Weber and Alexei Emelin. 

Aaron Palushaj has the lowest puck-possession ratio, but has a limited amount of events. Among players with substantial events, Travis Moen has the lowest puck-possession ratio. Moen makes only 1.54 plays that acquire or maintain puck possession for every 1 play that either loses or fails to acquire puck-possession. Andrei Kostitsyn has the second lowest ratio (1.57).

Raphael Diaz and Hal Gill are the two defensemen with the lowest puck-possession ratio. Both players make 1.84 plays that maintain or acquire puck possession for every 1 play that either loses or fails to acquire puck-possession.

What is this? 
I track each and every play during a game. The main focus being on puck-possession. Any play by a player that maintains or acquires puck-possession is deemed a positive-event, while any play that fails to acquire, or loses puck-possession is considered a negative-event. I input the result into a database, allowing me to track players' successes or failures. I average approximately 1100 points of data per-game (when covering an entire team), or about 70 points of data per-player. Most players average just over 3 events per minute of ice-time. Whether it's an incomplete or complete pass-attempt, a won or lost race to a loose puck, a won or lost puck-battle, etc.; each result is tracked for each player. The results are also tracked by zone (offensive/defensive/neutral) and by situation (even-strength/powerplay/short-handed) and inputted into the database as such. This allows us to track how each player performs in each zone, and in each manpower situation.  Click the FAQ tab above for further information.

1 comment:

  1. How do you track all this data Chris? Seems like a mountain of work.

    ReplyDelete