Friday, September 30, 2011

Habs: Numbers show Gomez off to Strong Start

Leads forwards in risk/reward rating

The target placed on Carey Price's back during last season's training camp has found a new home on the back of Scott Gomez's sweater. Gomez had an underwhelming season last year. He ended the regular season with the fifth-lowest risk/reward among Canadiens' forwards. He had trouble winning offensive-zone puck-battles, killing many offensive forays with a soft giveaway. His playoff risk/reward rose slightly, but so did the team average. With the curve adjusted Gomez' playoff risk/reward versus the Boston Bruins was the third-lowest among Hab forwards.

With one preseason game to play Gomez is leading all forwards in even-strength risk/reward (2.04). Expressed differently his ES risk/reward shows that he made 3 successful plays for every 1 mistake or lost puck-battle. He hasn't necessarily ripped it up in the offensive-zone; winning only 43% of his offensive-zone puck-battles, while completing 64% of his o-zone passes. But, his ability and willingness to get the puck on net (all 7 attempted shots found the net), has helped make up for any failures along the boards.

His defensive-zone play has also improved. His even-strength defensive-zone risk/reward (0.48) is fourth-best among forwards. He's won 75% of his d-zone puck-battles, and has completed 78% of his d-zone passes. He's also lost only 1 of 22 puck-races through the entire preseason.

Gomez has played less than 2 minutes shorthanded during the entire preseason. Which may be a good thing, as his SH risk/reward rating is last among forwards still in camp. Expressed differently, his SH risk/reward shows that he made 1 successful play for every 2 mistakes or lost puck-battles. That said, his powerplay risk/reward (3.25) is tops among forwards. Expressed differently, Gomez PP risk/reward shows that he made 3 successful plays for every 1 mistake or lost puck-battle.

Keep in mind that this is incredibly early. Gomez showed himself to be anything but consistent last year. That said, metrics like puck-battles and loose-puck races show a much more focused Gomez, while the increase in shots making it through to the net reflect a possible tactical shift, as well. A solid season, with numbers similar to those produced so far, will go along way to ensuring the proverbial target on number 11's sweater finds a new home next season.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Habs: Moen with Lowest Numbers Among Players Left in Camp

Younger players knocking at the door

Travis Moen has the lowest grade and risk/reward rating among players left in camp. In fact, his overall risk/reward rating of 0.55 is 0.55 points below his closest teammate, and well below the team's 1.41 average (average includes all players who have played a game during the preseason; including those already cut). That said, the sample size is small, and Moen was injured during his last appearance.

Moen also has the lowest grade (59) among his teammates who remain in camp; six percentage points lower than his closest teammate. Surprisingly, Moen's best work has been done in the offensive-zone, while his work in the defensive, and neutral-zones have been well below average. 

His offensive-zone risk/reward rating of 0.34 is only 9 points below the team average.  Expressed differently, Moen made 2 successful plays (completed pass, won puck-battle, etc.) for every 1 mistake or lost puck-battle. He won 4 of 7 offensive-zone puck-battles, and completed 5 of 6 offensive-zone pass-attempts. He managed 3 shots on net, while 2 other shot-attempts were blocked.

His defensive-zone risk/reward rating of 0.07 is well below the team average of 0.56. Expressed differently, Moen's d-zone risk/reward shows that he made only 1.21 successful plays for every 1 mistake or lost puck-battle. He completed only 4 of 9 defensive-zone passes, while winning only 3 of 5 d-zone puck-battles. He also had 3 opposition passes go either under his stick or between his legs.

Moen's neutral-zone risk/reward rating of 0.14 is well below the team average of 0.43. Expressed differently, this shows that Moen made 1.3 successful plays for every 1 mistake or lost puck-battle. He lost 3 of 5 neutral-zone puck-battles, while completing 4 of 6 neutral-zone passes. He was successful with only 1 of 3 opportunities to dump the puck deep into the offensive-zone. That said, he successfully carried the puck into the offensive-zone 3 separate times.

Moen's risk/reward rating of 0.79 while short-handed is just slightly below the team average.

Last season, most of Moen's risk/reward ratings were at, or around the team average. In fact, he had the top neutral-zone risk/reward rating of any player last season. With that in mind, we can comfortably say that the bar has been set by Moen, himself. We look forward to some improving numbers as the season progresses.

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Ellis and Archambault With Top Ratings Among Recent Cuts

Ellis with roster's second-best risk/reward rating

Morgan Ellis and Olivier Archambault left the Montreal Canadiens training camp with the top risk/reward ratings among players who've been cut.  Both will have lead roles with their respective junior teams this season. Ellis is a 6'2", 204 lbs defenseman with the Cape Breton Screaming Eagles, while Archambault is a 5'11", 181 lbs left winger with the Drummondville Voltigeurs.

No other cut prospects have risk/reward ratings above the team's preseason average of 1.41. Ellis' overall risk/reward rating actually places him 2nd only to PK Subban among all players, while Archambault's 1.62 rating is good enough for 12th-best.


#85 Morgan Ellis

 Ellis played just over 20 minutes. His grade and risk/reward ratings are the product of strong play in both the neutral and defensive-zones. Expressed differently his overall risk/reward shows that he made 6 successful plays (won puck-battle, blocked shot, etc) for every mistake or lost puck-battle. He won 86% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, while getting to loose pucks before opposition players at an efficiency rate of 89%. He also completed an incredible 90% of his attempted passes from the defensive-zone. He blocked 2 shots and was able to get his stick in the way of 2 out of 4 "blockable" passes.

His neutral-zone play was very impressive. He was not credited with any negative events in the neutral-zone. He won all 4 loose-puck races he was involved in, while completing both of his attempted passes and one attempt to beat an opposition player 1on1 (deak). He was successful with all 9 of his attempts to dump the puck in-deep, and carried the puck deap into the opposition's zone on 2 other occasions.

Ellis also played just under 4 minutes while the Habs were short-handed. His short-handed risk/reward rating of 2.11 is third-best among all players; surpassed only by Tomas Plekanec and PK Subban.


Grade: 82
Risk/Reward: 2.56
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.00
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.58
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.99


#78 Olivier Archambault

 Archambault played 27 minutes. His risk/reward rating is the product of solid work in both the offensive and neutral-zones. Half of his offensive-zone events took place while the Habs were on the powerplay, while the other half took place at even-strength. The young Archambault won all 10 of his offensive-zone puck-races, while also completing 76% of his offensive-zone passes. He was among the team leaders with 7 successful attempts to beat opposing players 1on1 (deak); failing with 3 other attempts. He was able to block 3 passes and pick up 2 offensive-zone takeaways.

Archambault was able to dump the puck in-deep during all 5 of his opportunities, while successfully carrying the puck into the offensive-zone during 2 of his 3 attempts. He won 2 of 4 neutral-zone puck-battles, but used his speed to win all 3 of his "loose-puck races". He also completed 67% of his neutral-zone pass-attempts. Expressed differently Archambault's overall risk/reward rating shows that he made 3 good plays (successful pass, won puck-battle, etc.) for every mistake or lost puck-battle.

Grade: 72
Risk/Reward: 1.62
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.03
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.18
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.37

Granted, this is a limited amount of events during a limited amount of ice-time. That said, both players played impressive hockey. Despite their respective ages, they won important puck-battles, completed a high percentage of passes, and showed more poise than many of their teammates. The most important byproduct of this preseason is that Ellis and Archambault both go back to their junior teams with confidence; a necessary ingredient in their development. 

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Montreal Canadiens Depth Chart

Montreal Canadiens depth chart (28-SEPTEMBER-2011)


Players listed by the level they are likely to play next year. The first number in parentheses is the player's grade from 2010-11. The second number is their overall risk/reward rating from 2010-11. All grades are from games played in the NHL last season; unless otherwise indicated.

For players with grades from games played outside the NHL, the first letter indicates the league where their grade was achieved.

Goalies are listed with their save percentages from 2010-11.



2011/2012

FORWARDS
PACIORETTY (66) (0.76) GOMEZ (61) (0.60) GIONTA (68) (0.80)
CAMMALLERI (62) (0.61) PLEKANEC (63) (0.77) COLE *(67) (0.98)
DESHARNAIS (61) (0.73) ELLER (60) (0.69) A. KOSTITSYN (62) (0.55)
MOEN (64) (0.65) ENGQVIST* (60) (0.76) DARCHE (66) (0.81)


WHITE (60) (0.57)
TROTTER LEBLANC (Q) (73) (2.27) PALUSHAJ* (54) (0.23)
BISHOP FORTIER WILLSIE
LEFEBVRE (Q) (61) (0.83) NATTINEN BLUNDEN (A) (72) (1.94)
CONBOY
AVTSIN (A) (65) (0.64)
BERGER (O) (73) (2.13)
DUMONT
MASSE
SCHULTZ
QUAILER BOURNIVAL (Q+) (70) (1.74) KRISTO
ARCHAMBAULT (Q) (62) (1.24) WALSH GALLAGHER (W+) (65) (1.31)
MACMILLAN PRIBYL PEREZHOGIN
TRUNEV CICHY
WESTIN


DEFENSEMEN
MARKOV* (70) (1.45)
GORGES* (73) (1.48)
GILL (66) (0.64)
SUBBAN (66) (0.84)
CAMPOLI
SPACEK (66) (0.52)
YEMELIN** (65) (1.05)
WEBER (62) (0.50)
WOYWITKA

MITERA (A) (75) (1.71)
DIAZ
NASH* (54) (0.25)
STEJSKAL
ST. DENIS

BEAULIEU (Q+) (72) (1.81)
DIDIER
TINORDI (O+) (64) (1.17)
NYGREN
BENNETT (U) (73) (0.90)
ELLIS (Q) (69) (1.63)
KORNEEV** (80) (2.10)
DIETZ (W) (68) (0.93)
KISHEL
PATERYN (U) (71) (1.13)


SULLIVAN


KLUBERTANZ

GOALIES

PRICE (.923)

BUDAJ (.895)

LAWSON (A) (.913)

MAYER (A) (.890)

DELMAS (E) (.928)








* = LIMITED GAMES IN NHL 
** = WORLD HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP
(A) = AHL
(E) = ECHL
(O) = OHL
(O+) = OHL PLUS USA WORLD JUNIOR EVALUATION CAMP
(Q) = QMJHL
(Q+) = QMJHL PLUS CANADIAN WORLD JUNIOR EVALUATION CAMP
(U) = NCAA
(W) = WHL
(W+) = WHL PLUS CANADIAN WORLD JUNIOR EVALUATION CAMP

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Habs: Gorges Playing Better Than Ever

Early numbers from exhibition season show Gorges' worth


Josh Gorges' and Andrei Markov's knee injuries were on the minds of fans, media and the Montreal Canadiens brain-trust throughout the off-season. Fans and media were worried about whether the Habs would bring back their two veteran defensemen, and whether they would be able to return to their former selves.

Canadiens management, on the other hand would never admit to their concern. It wouldn't be an intelligent business-decision to under-value your players or roster with public concern about players' health. That said, they communicated their concern with roster moves; adding Jeff Woywitka, Mark Mitera, Raphael Diaz and Alexei Yemelin. The goal of these moves being two-fold; improve the team's defensive-depth, while insulating against any potential injuries.

To date, we have no tangible information on Markov's return. But, Josh Gorges is burning up the preseason. His numbers through 2 games are not only among the team-leaders, they are already better than numbers he obtained prior to last season's injury.

Following Saturday's preseason game against Ottawa Gorges is second only to PK Subban in overall risk/reward. His 2.59 rating is the product of solid work in the defensive-zone, as well as dominating puck-battles while short-handed. He's also put up some strong numbers on the powerplay; something we've never seen before. Expressed differently, Gorges overall risk/reward rating shows that he makes 5 successful plays (completed pass, won puck-battle, etc.) for every mistake or lost puck-battle.

Gorges has the top even-strength defensive-zone risk/reward rating (1.58). He has won an incredible 92% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, while winning races to loose pucks at an efficiency-rate of 81%. He also completed 87% of his attempted passes from the defensive-zone; second only to Alexei Yemelin. Gorges also showed his usual strong play covering passing and shooting-lanes, as he blocked 6 shots and 3 passes. Expressed differently, Gorges even-strength d-zone risk/reward rating shows that Gorges makes 4 successful plays (completed pass, won puck-battle, etc.) for every mistake or lost puck-battle.

Gorges has the third-best neutral-zone risk/reward rating (0.52) behind only Subban and Raphael Diaz. Gorges has yet to lose a neutral-zone puck-battle, and has completed 90% of his neutral-zone passes. He's also notched 2 neutral-zone takeaways.

Gorges special-team performance has been exceptional. His short-handed (3.38) and powerplay (3.98) risk/reward ratings are both second to PK Subban. While playing short-handed, number 26 has won 80% of his defensive-zone puck-battles and has yet to lose a race for a loose-puck. He's also completed 100% of his d-zone passes, while completing 60% of his attempts to dump the puck out of the defensive-zone.

Through 2 games, Gorges has over 8 minutes of powerplay ice time. He's completed 92% of his offensive-zone passes, while completing all of his attempted dump-ins. He's also managed 1 o-zone takeaway while playing with the man advantage.

Gorges powerplay time will likely diminish as the regular season arrives. However, his work at even-strength and short-handed bode well for the upcoming season. The increase in defensive-depth will not be required to off-set any drop in performance from Gorges. According to his preseason play to date, he is every bit the player he was prior to the injury; possibly even better.

Friday, September 23, 2011

Habs: Diaz With Top Even-Strength Risk/Reward Through First Two Games

Numbers through first two games of preseason

Here we will focus on even-strength performance only. This season I will not only break the numbers down by zone. I will also separate events into even-strength, powerplay and short-handed situations.


Gorges with top grade
A player's grade is calculated by dividing the number of positive events a player performs in a game (completed pass, takeaway, etc.) by that player's total events (successful + unsuccessful). It does not take into account ice-time.


Diaz with top Risk/Reward
A player's risk/reward is calculated by dividing the total positive events a player performs by a player's ice-time. We then subtract a players negative-events per-minute of ice time from this number to indicate a player's risk/reward rating.
Simply put; it is the difference between a player's "good plays" and "bad plays" for every minute they are on the ice. The bigger the number, the more "good plays" that player makes than "bad plays".
In an instance like this one where we are focusing on even-strength events, the player's events only while playing at even-strength are divided by that player's ice-time while at even-strength.


Spacek with top offensive-zone risk/reward
Like overall risk/reward, offensive-zone risk/reward is the difference between "good plays" and "bad plays" per minute of ice-time. The only difference is that the events in this category are limited to those plays that take place in the offensive-zone. A high offensive-zone risk/reward rating is obtained by completing offensive-zone passes, winning offensive-zone puck-battles, getting shots on net, etc.


St. Denis with top defensive-zone risk/reward rating
Like overall risk/reward rating, defensive-zone risk/reward is the difference between "good plays" and "bad plays" per minute of ice-time. The difference is that the events in this category are limited to those plays that take place in the defensive-zone. A high defensive-zone risk/reward  rating is obtained by completing defensive-zone passes, winning d-zone puck-battles, blocking shots, blocking passes, etc.


Diaz with top neutral-zone risk/reward rating
Like overall risk/reward rating, neutral-zone risk/reward is the difference between "good plays" and "bad plays" per minute of ice-time. The difference is that the events in this category are limited to those plays that take place in the neutral-zone. A high neutral-zone risk/reward  rating is obtained by completing neutral-zone passes, successfully dumping, or carrying the puck into the offensive-zone, blocking passes, winning puck-battles, etc.

**The number in brackets beside the players grade risk/reward indicates where this number places them in respect to the other Habs defensemen. ie. (1) = indicates top grade or risk reward rating in that category. (2)= second-best grade or risk/reward rating within that category, etc.


#6 Jaroslav Spacek

Spacek made some solid decision in the offensive-zone. He kept the puck in-deep on multiple occasions by winning all of his o-zone puck-battles, and o-zone races to loose pucks (new metric).


Grade: 70 (9)
Risk/Reward: 1.51 (8)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.60 (1)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.75 (11)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.15 (8)


#8 Jeff Woywitka

Woywitka made solid decisions, and was among the leaders in all categories. He completed 83% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts, while managing 1 blocked shot and 1 blocked pass.

Grade: 80 (2)
Risk/Reward: 2.05 (3)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.24 (4)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.15 (5)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.36 (3)


# 24 Alex Henry

Henry showed an impressive stick down-low and along the wall. He won 82% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but completed only 64% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 71 (8)
Risk/Reward: 1.53 (7)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.24 (12)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.45 (3)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.08 (11)


#26 Josh Gorges

Gorges did most of his best work on the penalty-kill, but still had a solid showing in both the neutral and defensive-zones. He won all of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and completed an incredible 93% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 82 (1)
Risk/Reward: 1.17 (10)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.14 (10)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.63 (2)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.41(2)


#40 Nathan Beaulieu

Beaulieu held his own. He sits in the middle of the pack for most categories. He won 86% of his defensive-zone puck-battles and completed 68% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts. He successfully blocked only 50% of pass-attempts. Any pass that goes under a player's stick, or through a player's legs is deemed "blockable". He was also credited twice with missing his coverage in the defensive-zone (new metric).

Grade: 73 (5)
Risk/Reward: 1.62 (6)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.10 (9)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.30 (4)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.36 (3)


#42 Jarred Tinordi

Tinordi won only 50% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and 57% of the defensive-zone races to loose pucks he engaged in. He also completed only 50% of his neutral-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 66 (12)
Risk/Reward: 1.08 (11)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.00 (8)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.91 (8)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.11 (9)


#61 Raphael Diaz

Diaz won 57% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and an impressive 86% of the races to loose puck he engaged in. He also completed 83% of his defensive and 100% of his offensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 73 (5)
Risk/Reward: 2.14 (1)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.18 (5)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.98 (7)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.79 (1)


#62 Frederick St. Denis

Like Diaz, St. Denis used his speed to win 86% of the races he engaged in while pursuing loose pucks. He won only 50% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but completed 83% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts.

Grade: 80 (2)
Risk/Reward: 2.11 (2)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.08 (6)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.72 (1)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.08 (11)


#68 Yannick Weber

Weber did his best work while short-handed, and played more powerplay and short-handed minutes than any other defenseman. He showed his solid-stick in the defensive-zone; winning 83% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but was only able to complete 60% of his offensive-zone and 50% of his neutral-zone passes.


Grade: 66 (11)
Risk/Reward: 1.05 (12)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.05 (7)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.84 (9)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.10 (10)


#74 Alexei Yemelin

Yemelin's grade was carried by his work in the offensive-zone, as he made solid decisions when attempting to support the attack in the offensive-zone. He won all 7 of the races he engaged in while skating to loose pucks. He also completed an incredible 91% of his defensive-zone pass-attempts. Like Beaulieu, Yemelin needs to work on his ability to block passing lanes, as he was only able to bock 17% of opponents' passes sent through him.


Grade: 73 (5)
Risk/Reward: 1.72 (5)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.32 (3)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.75 (11)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.16 (7)


#75 Hal Gill

Gill had a tough start to the game, but improved as the game progressed. He won 60% of his defensive-zone puck-battles, but his lack of foot speed caused him to loose 60% of the puck-races he engaged in.


Grade: 67 (10)
Risk/Reward: 1.34 (9)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: -0.14 (10)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 1.13 (6)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.28 (6)


#76 PK. Subban

When playing on the powerplay or short-handed, Subban looked like a man among boys. His numbers at even-strength place him among the leaders in most categories. He won 80%  of his defensive-zone puck-battles, and competed 83% of his defensive-zone passes. He got in the way of 67% of "blockable" passes, while also completing 100% of his offensive-zone pass-attempts.


Grade: 80 (2)
Risk/Reward: 1.78 (4)
Offensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.48 (2)
Defensive Zone Risk/Reward: 0.82 (10)
Neutral Zone Risk/Reward: 0.34 (5)

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Habs: Numbers Point to Gomez Rebound

Number 2 centre playing with top-2 wingers

Scott Gomez will have every opportunity to find success this season. He's coming off a tough season. He lost an inordinate amount of puck-battles, while his usually successful high-risk passes routinely missed their mark. The key to Gomez's turnaround this season will not be his own play, but the play of the Montreal Canadiens two best wingers.

Gomez is expected to start the season between Max Pacioretty and Brian Gionta. Both wingers had the top numbers in multiple metrics last season. In fact, their numbers were often head-and-shoulders above those of their teammates.

Captain Brian Gionta had the top average grade last season (68). He also posted the second-best overall risk/reward rating among forwards (.80); second to Mathieu Darche's 0.81. Despite his size, Gionta was among the team-leaders in successful puck-battles. He was fourth among forwards with a 56% success-rate when engaging in offensive-zone puck-battles, and tops among forwards with a 63% success-rate in the d-zone. His winning-percentage of 61% in the neutral-zone placed him third among the Habs forward group.

Pacioretty had impressive numbers as well. He ended the season with the Canadiens second-best overall grade (66), and had the fourth-best overall risk/reward rating among forwards; behind only Darche, Gionta and Tomas Plekanec. He was second among forwards with a 59% success-rate when engaging in offensive-zone puck-battles, and had the best neutral-zone success-rate (68%) of any player on the team. Pacioretty has an impressive ability to create turnovers on the back-check. It's an ability that can be traced back to his days in the USHL. This ability will be a key ingredient to the Habs transition-game. Especially when we consider Gomez's speed and puck-carrying prowess through the neutral-zone.

Please don't misunderstand. Gomez is not a victim. He's simply a hockey player who's main talents require the support of solid line mates, with specific abilities. Gomez skates; Gomez carries the puck; Gomez finds the open-man. But, Gomez does not win puck-battles.

Pacioretty and Gionta do.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Habs: New One Game Scouting Report for Nathan Beaulieu

Beaulieu played big minutes during tough opening-night loss


Nathan Beaulieu was the Montreal Canadiens first round pick in the 2011 NHL Entry draft. The 6'2"  left-handed defenseman begins his very first NHL rookie camp today. This scouting report is from the first game of the current season; a 3-1 loss to the visiting Moncton Wildcats. Beaulieu played 27 minutes in the game. He saw first line duty on both the powerplay and penalty-killing units.

Overall Grade

Bealieu ended the game with a grade of 75.  He had an incredible 126 events during the game, which average out to 4.6 events per minute of ice-time. His grade was 3 percentage points above his average. This, despite finishing the game with a minus-1 plus/minus rating.


28
WINS 94 WINS
BATTLES 126 BATTLES
GRADE 75 GRADE
PLAYER 28


Overall Risk/Reward Rating

Beaulieu's overall risk/reward rating of 2.30 was 0.46 points above his average. Expressed differently, this rating means that Beaulieu managed 2 successful plays for every mistake or lost battle. He was also more involved in the play than usual; averaging over 0.50 more events per minute than his average. The young defenseman's top rating came in the defensive-zone.


28
MINUTES 27 MINUTES
POS/MIN 3.48 POS/MIN
NEG/MIN 1.19 NEG/MIN

28
EVENTS/ MIN 4.67 EVENTS/ MIN
RISK/REWARD 2.30 RISK/REWARD

28


Offensive-zone Risk/Reward Rating

Beaulieu's offensive-zone risk/reward rating of 0.41 was 0.12 points above his average. He won 70% of his offensive-zone puck-battles, while completing 58% of his pass-attempts. Both numbers earned in this metric were below his current average. He did however, play a very confident game. Beating opposing players 1on1 (deaks)with 75% of his attempts. Number 28 struggled getting the puck through to the front of the net early in the game. He had 6 attempted shots blocked, many of which were the result of being too stationary in the offensive-zone. He needs to use his mobility prior to shots; either by walking the line or skating himself into open shooting lanes.


28
MINUTES 27 MINUTES
POS/MIN 0.96 POS/MIN
NEG/MIN 0.56 NEG/MIN

28
EVENTS/ MIN 1.52 EVENTS/ MIN
RISK/REWARD 0.41 RISK/REWARD

28


Defensive-zone Risk/Reward Rating

Beaulieu's defensive-zone risk/reward rating of 1.04 was just below his average. He earned his rating on the strength of his passing and skating abilities. He completed 88% of his d-zone pass-attempts, while being successful with 80% of his attempts to beat opposing player 1on1 (deaks). He won just 52% of his d-zone puck-battles. However, this low mark is still slightly above his average. His low puck-battle winning percentage is the product of his work coming off the defensive-zone cycle.  Beaulieu tends to get beat back to the front of the net by the opposing forwards, thereby blocking himself out. This prohibits him from winning puck-battles in front of his own net.


28
MINUTES 27 MINUTES
POS/MIN 1.59 POS/MIN
NEG/MIN 0.56 NEG/MIN

28
EVENTS/ MIN 2.15 EVENTS/ MIN
RISK/REWARD 1.04 RISK/REWARD

28


Neutral-zone Risk/Reward Rating

Beaulieu's neutral-zone risk/reward rating (0.74) was double his average. He won 75% of his neutal-zone puck-battles, while completing 100% of his attempted passes. He was also successful with both of his attempts to beat opposing players 1on1 (deaks). Most impressive was his puck-management skills through the neutral-zone. He was successful with all 7 of his attempts to carry the puck into the offensive-zone, as well as both of his attempts to dump the puck in-deep. Beaulieu's speed and vision through the neutral-zone continues to be head-and-shoulders above most players his age.


28
MINUTES 27 MINUTES
POS/MIN 0.78 POS/MIN
NEG/MIN 0.04 NEG/MIN

28
EV/ MIN 0.81 EVENTS/ MIN
RISK/REWARD 0.74 RISK/REWARD

28



Raw data for 3-1 loss to the Moncton Wildcats on September 8th, 2011


28
OZPBW 7 OZPBW
OZPBL 3 OZPBL
OZPASS+ 7 OZPASS+
OZPASS- 5 OZPASS-
OZDEAK+ 3 OZDEAK+
OZDEAK- 1 OZDEAK-
SKI + 7 SKI +
SKI-
SKI-
DI+ 2 DI+
DI-
DI-
OZTA
OZTA

28
DZPBW 12 DZPBW
DZPBL 11 DZPBL
DZPASS+ 21 DZPASS+
DZPASS- 3 DZPASS-
DZDEAK+ 4 DZDEAK+
DZDEAK- 1 DZDEAK-
PK DUMP+ 2 PK DUMP+
PK DUMP-
PK DUMP-
DZTA 1 DZTA
DZ-BL-SHOT
DZ-BL-SHOT
DZ-BL-PASS 3 DZ-BL-PASS

28
NZPBW 3 NZPBW
NZPBL 1 NZPBL
NZPASS+ 6 NZPASS+
NZPASS-
NZPASS-
NZDEAK+ 2 NZDEAK+
NZDEAK-
NZDEAK-
NZTA 1 NZTA

28
DZFOW
DZFOW
DZFOL
DZFOL
DZPKFOW
DZPKFOW
DZPKFOL
DZPKFOL
OZPPFOW
OZPPFOW
OZPPFOL
OZPPFOL
OZFOW
OZFOW
OZFOL
OZFOL
NZFOW
NZFOW
NZFOL
NZFOL

28
PS THRU 9 PS THRU
OZ PS BL 6 OZ PS BL
POINTS X2
POINTS X2
+/- -1 +/-
SHOTS 7 SHOTS

28
WINS 94 WINS
BATTLES 126 BATTLES
GRADE 75 GRADE
PLAYER 28